Rt Rev. Mark Davies: The Real Victory To Be Won

On election night in America, Bishop Mark Davies reflects on the Catholic view of history. He notes, with Blessed John Henry Newman, that the Catholic view enncompasses both looking backwards at the long history of the Church and looking forward with confidence to the ultimate victory of Christ.

Rt Rev. Mark Davies is Bishop of the Diocese of Shrewsbury in the Province of Birmingham, England. Bishop Davies’ talk “The Real Victory To Be Won” was sponsored by the Catechetical Institute at Franciscan University of Steubenville.

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John Garvey — The Gift of the Holy Spirit as Con-natural

John Garvey, President of the Catholic University of America, describes the nature of the gifts of the Holy Spirit in this excerpt from his talk, “John Henry Newman and Catholic Education”.  Mr. Garvey’s talk was part of the Inaugural Symposium on Catholic Higher Education and the New Evangelization at Franciscan University of Steubenville.

John Garvey — John Henry Newman and Catholic Education

John Garvey, President of the Catholic University of America, delivers his talk, “John Henry Newman and Catholic Education”.  Mr. Garvey’s talk was part of the Inaugural Symposium on Catholic Higher Education and the New Evangelization at Franciscan University of Steubenville.

Dr. John Crosby — Primordial Religious Knowledge: What it IS

Dr. John Crosby, professor of philosophy at Franciscan University of Steubenville, delivered a lecture during the spring 2011 semester on “Newman’s Personalist Way to God Through Conscience” at Franciscan University. It was the fifth in a series of five lectures by Dr. Crosby on “The Christian Personalism of Blessed John Henry Newman.”  In this talk, Dr. Crosby pursues Blessed Cardinal Newman’s discussion of a primordial, existential knowledge of God, “religious knowledge that involves a real apprehension of God.”  He discusses Newman’s distinction between the theological intellect and the religious imagination, compares Freud’s account of conscience with Newman’s, and points towards a synthetic understanding of the human person’s approach to God.

Primordial Religious Knowledge: What it is NOT

Dr. John Crosby, professor of philosophy at Franciscan University of Steubenville, delivered a lecture during the spring 2011 semester on “Newman’s Personalist Way to God Through Conscience” at Franciscan University. It was the fifth in a series of five lectures by Dr. Crosby on “The Christian Personalism of Blessed John Henry Newman.”  In this talk, Dr. Crosby pursues Blessed Cardinal Newman’s discussion of a primordial, existential knowledge of God, “religious knowledge that involves a real apprehension of God.”  He discusses Newman’s distinction between the theological intellect and the religious imagination, compares Freud’s account of conscience with Newman’s, and points towards a synthetic understanding of the human person’s approach to God.

Informal Inference: Where Reason Meets Personhood

Dr. John Crosby, professor of philosophy at Franciscan University of Steubenville, delivered a lecture during the spring 2011 semester on “Newman on the Personal Exercise of Reason” at Franciscan University. It was the fourth in a series of five lectures by Dr. Crosby on “The Christian Personalism of Blessed John Henry Newman.”  In this lecture, Dr. Crosby discusses Newman’s distinction between formal and informal logic, between narrowly defined terms inserted into nearly mathematical syllogisms and encountering truth in the full organic complexity of thought and reality.

The Relationship Between Reason and Historical Facts

Dr. John Crosby, professor of philosophy at Franciscan University of Steubenville, delivered a lecture during the spring 2011 semester on “Newman on the Personal Exercise of Reason” at Franciscan University. It was the fourth in a series of five lectures by Dr. Crosby on “The Christian Personalism of Blessed John Henry Newman.”  In this lecture, Dr. Crosby discusses Newman’s distinction between formal and informal logic, between narrowly defined terms inserted into nearly mathematical syllogisms and encountering truth in the full organic complexity of thought and reality.

Personal Encounter with God

Dr. John Crosby, professor of philosophy at Franciscan University of Steubenville, delivered a lecture during the spring 2011 semester on “The Human Person as a World of His Own” at Franciscan University. It was the second in a series of five lectures by Dr. Crosby on “The Christian Personalism of Blessed John Henry Newman.”  In this lecture, Dr. Crosby discusses Newman’s understanding of the human person.  Citing a “really memorable expression of Newman’s,” Crosby says, “[The human person] has a depth within him unfathomable, an infinite abyss of existence, and the social scene in which he bears part is but for the moment, like a gleam of sunshine upon its surface…Newman proceeds to say that only in relation with God can all the affections of which we are capable awaken, even though this encounter with God is in the darkness of faith…if we only lived in relation to finite beings, we would never know how vast our heart is, nor suspect the infinite abyss of existence in it.”  We come to discover in ourselves a capax dei, a capacity for God, and so an infinity in our hearts.

The Human Person Before God

Dr. John Crosby, professor of philosophy at Franciscan University of Steubenville, delivered a lecture during the spring 2011 semester on “The Human Person as a World of His Own” at Franciscan University. It was the second in a series of five lectures by Dr. Crosby on “The Christian Personalism of Blessed John Henry Newman.”  In this lecture, Dr. Crosby discusses Newman’s understanding of the human person.  Citing a “really memorable expression of Newman’s,” Crosby says, “[The human person] has a depth within him unfathomable, an infinite abyss of existence, and the social scene in which he bears part is but for the moment, like a gleam of sunshine upon its surface…Newman proceeds to say that only in relation with God can all the affections of which we are capable awaken, even though this encounter with God is in the darkness of faith…if we only lived in relation to finite beings, we would never know how vast our heart is, nor suspect the infinite abyss of existence in it.”  We come to discover in ourselves a capax dei, a capacity for God, and so an infinity in our hearts.

It’s Personal: The Difference Between Notional and Real Apprehension

Dr. John Crosby, professor of philosophy at Franciscan University of Steubenville, delivered a lecture during the spring 2011 semester on “Personalist Spirit of Newman’s Thought” at Franciscan University. It was the first in a series of five lectures by Dr. Crosby on “The Christian Personalism of Blessed John Henry Newman.”  In this inaugural lecture, Dr. Crosby identifies the major markers of the personalist school of thought and situates Blessed Newman in the personalist philosophical tradition.  “[Newman] engages us personally by his special gift of awakening in us real apprehension,” said Dr. Crosby, a real apprehension which “touched to life” the truths of the faith in the minds and hearts of his hearers once again.

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