Emily Stimpson: Theology of the Body and the Zombie Apocalypse: A Survival Guide

Emily Stimpson, author of “These Beautiful Bones: An Everyday Theology of the Body”, delivers her talk entitled “Theology of the Body and the Zombie Apocalypse: A Survival Guide”. Ms. Stimpson was a Student Life Featured Speaker at Franciscan University of Steubenville.

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Emily Stimpson — Theology of the Body and Everyday Life

For over 30 years, Catholics have found in Pope John Paul II’s Theology of the Body a guide for living the truth of the Church’s teachings on human sexuality. But what does the Theology of the Body have to do with the rest of life?

Learn the answer to that question and more as Emily Stimpson discusses her book, These Beautiful Bones: An Everyday Theology of the Body, with host Michael Hernon, vice president of Advancement, and theology panelists Dr. Regis Martin and Dr. Scott Hahn of Franciscan University.

Download the free handout: “Theology of the Body and Everyday Life”

May 2014 Show: “Theology of the Body and Everyday Life”

Mike AquilinaWith special guest Emily Stimpson, author of “These Beautiful Bones: An Everyday Theology of the Body”, as they discuss how John Paul II’s well-known writings can be applied to every aspect of our lives.

Download the free handout: “Theology of the Body and Everyday Life”

Superhero films: a search for moral greatness

By Emily Stimpson

What movies such as “Iron Man” and “Spider-Man” say about our culture and about human nature

(An Interview with Dr. Jonathan Sanford, Professor of Philosophy at Franciscan University of Steubenville)

With summer just around the corner, there’s already buzz about what this season’s blockbuster films will be. At the top of the list of sure-fire hits are the superhero movies: “Iron Man 3” hits theaters May 3; “Man of Steel” (Superman) will be released June 14; and “The Wolverine” comes to the big screen July 26. It’s clear Hollywood has found success in showcasing movie heroes who fly. Or scale tall buildings. Or wield mystical hammers. Basically, they fill the screen with super-powered heroes, then watch the money flow in.

Why is that? Why do films like these never fail to attract moviegoers of all ages, sexes and socioeconomic demographics? What explains our culture’s perennial love of superheroes, a love that only has seemed to grow in recent years with the popularity of the latest Batman trilogy, the Iron Man films and even television series such as “Smallville”?

Read more at Our Sunday Visitor.

 

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