Archbishop Charles J. Chaput: Living Christian Joy

Most Rev. Charles J. Chaput, OFM Cap, Archbishop of Philadelphia, visits Franciscan University as part of the Pope Francis’ Vision for the Renewal of the Church Symposium. He presents on the role of the Christian in the broken world in which we live drawing especially from his newest book, “Strangers in a Strange Land: Living the Catholic Faith in a Post-Christian World”.

In this insight, Archbishop Chaput discusses the confidence and hope of true Christianity in this excerpt from his talk entitled, “The Mission of the Church in the New America.”

View the full talk here.

 

Priest treks across U.S. on pro-life pilgrimage

By Emily Stimpson.

Father Dan Pattee spent his summer spreading Gospel of Life and witnessing firsthand the devastation of abortion.

Rising at dawn and offering Mass is nothing out of the ordinary for any priest. Walking 30-plus miles after the Mass, across America’s highways and byways with a bunch of college students, however, is a little less ordinary — unless you’re Father Dan Pattee.

In the summer of 2012, Father Pattee, a professor of theology at Franciscan University of Steubenville, teamed up with Crossroads for the second time (the first was in 2007), and walked across America, from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C., on a pro-life pilgrimage.

Read more at Our Sunday Visitor.

The Year of Faith: The Bible, the Eucharist, and the New Evangelization

A biblical theologian and Franciscan University professor discusses the recently-begun Year of Faith.

The new evangelization was never meant to be a short-term project.  That much should have been clear to anyone paying attention to Pope John Paul II in 1983.

That year, while addressing the Latin American Bishops’ Conference in Haiti, the Pope called for the Church universal to embark on a new evangelization of the post-Christian West.  He didn’t, however, simply call for a new evangelization: He also laid out a timeline.

Read more at Franciscan Way.

Jeff Cavins — “Offer it Up”: Opportunities to Grow in Holiness

Jeff Cavins, author and creator of EWTN’s Life on the Rock, spoke to Franciscan University of Steubenville’s 2011 Applied Biblical Studies Conference “Unveiling the Mystery: The Book of Revelation.”  In this talk, “Redemptive Suffering”, Cavins addresses the problem of pain, speaking from personal experience and the wisdom of the Scriptures, popes, and saints.  He explains the mysterious gift given to Christians: we are permitted to suffer alongside Jesus as a witness and martyr. “What is lacking in the suffering of Jesus?” asks Cavins.  “Nothing.  But you are allowed to participate…Many of us are missing the opportunity for the Passion in our own lives, and it doesn’t become salvific.”

Dr. John Crosby — Primordial Religious Knowledge: What it IS

Dr. John Crosby, professor of philosophy at Franciscan University of Steubenville, delivered a lecture during the spring 2011 semester on “Newman’s Personalist Way to God Through Conscience” at Franciscan University. It was the fifth in a series of five lectures by Dr. Crosby on “The Christian Personalism of Blessed John Henry Newman.”  In this talk, Dr. Crosby pursues Blessed Cardinal Newman’s discussion of a primordial, existential knowledge of God, “religious knowledge that involves a real apprehension of God.”  He discusses Newman’s distinction between the theological intellect and the religious imagination, compares Freud’s account of conscience with Newman’s, and points towards a synthetic understanding of the human person’s approach to God.

Primordial Religious Knowledge: What it is NOT

Dr. John Crosby, professor of philosophy at Franciscan University of Steubenville, delivered a lecture during the spring 2011 semester on “Newman’s Personalist Way to God Through Conscience” at Franciscan University. It was the fifth in a series of five lectures by Dr. Crosby on “The Christian Personalism of Blessed John Henry Newman.”  In this talk, Dr. Crosby pursues Blessed Cardinal Newman’s discussion of a primordial, existential knowledge of God, “religious knowledge that involves a real apprehension of God.”  He discusses Newman’s distinction between the theological intellect and the religious imagination, compares Freud’s account of conscience with Newman’s, and points towards a synthetic understanding of the human person’s approach to God.

Informal Inference: Where Reason Meets Personhood

Dr. John Crosby, professor of philosophy at Franciscan University of Steubenville, delivered a lecture during the spring 2011 semester on “Newman on the Personal Exercise of Reason” at Franciscan University. It was the fourth in a series of five lectures by Dr. Crosby on “The Christian Personalism of Blessed John Henry Newman.”  In this lecture, Dr. Crosby discusses Newman’s distinction between formal and informal logic, between narrowly defined terms inserted into nearly mathematical syllogisms and encountering truth in the full organic complexity of thought and reality.

The Relationship Between Reason and Historical Facts

Dr. John Crosby, professor of philosophy at Franciscan University of Steubenville, delivered a lecture during the spring 2011 semester on “Newman on the Personal Exercise of Reason” at Franciscan University. It was the fourth in a series of five lectures by Dr. Crosby on “The Christian Personalism of Blessed John Henry Newman.”  In this lecture, Dr. Crosby discusses Newman’s distinction between formal and informal logic, between narrowly defined terms inserted into nearly mathematical syllogisms and encountering truth in the full organic complexity of thought and reality.

Personal Encounter with God

Dr. John Crosby, professor of philosophy at Franciscan University of Steubenville, delivered a lecture during the spring 2011 semester on “The Human Person as a World of His Own” at Franciscan University. It was the second in a series of five lectures by Dr. Crosby on “The Christian Personalism of Blessed John Henry Newman.”  In this lecture, Dr. Crosby discusses Newman’s understanding of the human person.  Citing a “really memorable expression of Newman’s,” Crosby says, “[The human person] has a depth within him unfathomable, an infinite abyss of existence, and the social scene in which he bears part is but for the moment, like a gleam of sunshine upon its surface…Newman proceeds to say that only in relation with God can all the affections of which we are capable awaken, even though this encounter with God is in the darkness of faith…if we only lived in relation to finite beings, we would never know how vast our heart is, nor suspect the infinite abyss of existence in it.”  We come to discover in ourselves a capax dei, a capacity for God, and so an infinity in our hearts.

The Human Person Before God

Dr. John Crosby, professor of philosophy at Franciscan University of Steubenville, delivered a lecture during the spring 2011 semester on “The Human Person as a World of His Own” at Franciscan University. It was the second in a series of five lectures by Dr. Crosby on “The Christian Personalism of Blessed John Henry Newman.”  In this lecture, Dr. Crosby discusses Newman’s understanding of the human person.  Citing a “really memorable expression of Newman’s,” Crosby says, “[The human person] has a depth within him unfathomable, an infinite abyss of existence, and the social scene in which he bears part is but for the moment, like a gleam of sunshine upon its surface…Newman proceeds to say that only in relation with God can all the affections of which we are capable awaken, even though this encounter with God is in the darkness of faith…if we only lived in relation to finite beings, we would never know how vast our heart is, nor suspect the infinite abyss of existence in it.”  We come to discover in ourselves a capax dei, a capacity for God, and so an infinity in our hearts.

It’s Personal: The Difference Between Notional and Real Apprehension

Dr. John Crosby, professor of philosophy at Franciscan University of Steubenville, delivered a lecture during the spring 2011 semester on “Personalist Spirit of Newman’s Thought” at Franciscan University. It was the first in a series of five lectures by Dr. Crosby on “The Christian Personalism of Blessed John Henry Newman.”  In this inaugural lecture, Dr. Crosby identifies the major markers of the personalist school of thought and situates Blessed Newman in the personalist philosophical tradition.  “[Newman] engages us personally by his special gift of awakening in us real apprehension,” said Dr. Crosby, a real apprehension which “touched to life” the truths of the faith in the minds and hearts of his hearers once again.

Conforming to Christ in a Noisy World

Jeff Cavins, author and creator of EWTN’s Life on the Rock, spoke to Franciscan University of Steubenville’s 2010 Defending the Faith Conference “Be Transformed by the Renewal of Your Mind.”   In this talk, “Walk With Eternity on Your Mind: How to Think and Live Differently”, he calls on all faithful Catholics to live in light of their eternal destination and always evangelize.  “Every person I meet is searching,” he said.  “They might act confident, they might act like they have it together, and their wallet might be bulging, but I know that inside, they’re searching.”  He described the modern sense of confusion without any overarching context for all the news and information that pours in every day and pointed to salvation history as a way to make sense of this overwhelming modern world.

Personal Spiritual Journey

Dion “The Wanderer” DiMucci, Rock and Roll Hall of Famer and creator of such classic hits as “The Wanderer”, and “Runaround Sue,” delivered his testimony of faith at Franciscan University of Steubenville’s 2011 Defending the Faith Conference.  He talks about the long road from early, immense success as a singer/songwriter to his descent into a hell of drug addiction.  Then his wife went for help.  Now, after over 40 years of sobriety, Dion knows and loves the Catholic faith of his childhood, thanking Jesus for his miraculous recovery.  “Millions of people hate the Catholic Church, but they don’t really know what it teaches,” said DiMucci, author of Dion: The Wanderer Talks Truth. “I didn’t know. I had no idea how beautiful it was. It’s so different standing in the center of it, looking out than being on the outside cursing it and kicking at it and yelling at it. I thought I was so smart! I was in this meeting once, and I said, ‘I was anti-Catholic,’ and this one guy says, ‘Ooh! I was never that smart!’…I walked right into the confessional,” DiMucci continued, “and Father Joe was there, and I’m so used to the 12-step way of looking people in the eye that I just walked in. I said, ‘Father, do you know, I thought I loved the Lord—I do love the Lord. I’ve been anti-Catholic and really in rebellion with the Body of Christ,’ and he’s like, ‘Ah, thank God. Stand up kid.’ He gives me a hug and says, ‘Welcome home!'”  He shares his journey (and a little taste of his music) with his brothers and sisters in Christ.

Early Career and Married Life

Dion “The Wanderer” DiMucci, Rock and Roll Hall of Famer and creator of such classic hits as “The Wanderer”, and “Runaround Sue,” delivered his testimony at Franciscan University of Steubenville’s 2011 Defending the Faith Conference “Ambassadors for Christ.”  He talks about the long road from early, immense success as a singer/songwriter to his descent into a hell of drug addiction.  Then his wife went for help.  Now, after over 40 years of sobriety, Dion knows and loves the Catholic faith of his childhood, thanking Jesus for his miraculous recovery.  “Millions of people hate the Catholic Church, but they don’t really know what it teaches,” said DiMucci, author of Dion: The Wanderer Talks Truth. “I didn’t know. I had no idea how beautiful it was. It’s so different standing in the center of it, looking out than being on the outside cursing it and kicking at it and yelling at it. I thought I was so smart! I was in this meeting once, and I said, ‘I was anti-Catholic,’ and this one guy says, ‘Ooh! I was never that smart!’…I walked right into the confessional,” DiMucci continued, “and Father Joe was there, and I’m so used to the 12-step way of looking people in the eye that I just walked in. I said, ‘Father, do you know, I thought I loved the Lord—I do love the Lord. I’ve been anti-Catholic and really in rebellion with the Body of Christ,’ and he’s like, ‘Ah, thank God. Stand up kid.’ He gives me a hug and says, ‘Welcome home!'”  He shares his journey (and a little taste of his music) with his brothers and sisters in Christ.

Dr. Scott Hahn — Faith and Hope are Distinct

Dr. Scott Hahn, the Father Michael Scanlan, TOR, Chair of Biblical Theology and the New Evangelization at Franciscan University of Steubenville, spoke to Franciscan University of Steubenville’s 2010 Defending the Faith Conference “Be Transformed by the Renewal of Your Mind.”  In his talk, “Should Catholics Have Assurance of Salvation?”, he explains the distinction between the belief that “once saved, always saved,” and the Catholic belief that followers of Christ may have the “assurance of hope.”  “Despair is like an act of spiritual suicide,” explained Hahn.  “You are never beyond the saving reach of God’s all-powerful mercy.  His love and his capacity to save us is always greater than our capacity to sin, if only we turn and repent.”

Dr. Scott Hahn — Holding on to Hope

Dr. Scott Hahn, the Fr. Michael Scanlan Chair in Biblical Theology and the New Evangelization, spoke to Franciscan University of Steubenville’s 2010 Defending the Faith Conference “Be Transformed by the Renewal of Your Mind.” In his talk, “Should Catholics Have Assurance of Salvation?”, he explains the distinction between the belief that “once saved, always saved,” and the Catholic belief that followers of Christ may have the “assurance of hope.” “Despair is like an act of spiritual suicide,” explained Hahn. “You are never beyond the saving reach of God’s all-powerful mercy. His love and his capacity to save us is always greater than our capacity to sin, if only we turn and repent.”

Franciscan University Presents on EWTN