Dr. Wiker on the Reformation Part 3

What effect did the threat of Islamic invasion have on the Reformation? Dr. Benjamin Wiker, Associate Professor of Political Science and Human Life Studies at Franciscan University of Steubenville and author of “The Reformation 500 Years Later: 12 Things You Need to Know,” describes how Luther’s view that the Islamic threat was punishment from God for corruption all the way to the highest ranks of the Church led to a short term vision. Luther thought the world was about to end and thus he was not concerned with the long term consequences of his words or actions. This expectation was one of the causes that made the Reformation a great splinter event in the Church rather than a true reformation.

Dr. Wiker on the Reformation Part 2

The history of the Church shows that disagreements, heresies, and reformations were present from the beginning. What was it about the early sixteenth century that allowed the Reformation to be something more? Dr. Benjamin Wiker, Associate Professor of Political Science and Human Life Studies at Franciscan University of Steubenville and author of “The Reformation 500 Years Later: 12 Things You Need to Know,” explains how recognizing the causes of the Reformation on both sides can aide greater Christian unity today.

Dr. Wiker on the Reformation

Why mark the 500th anniversary of the Reformation? In this insight Dr. Benjamin Wiker, Associate Professor of Political Science and Human Life Studies at Franciscan University of Steubenville and author of “The Reformation 500 Years Later: 12 Things You Need to Know,” offers two reasons why knowledge of the Reformation five hundred years ago helps us understand our situation today.

Steve Ray – Being Born Again

Steve Ray, conference speaker and pilgrimage leader, discusses the Evangelical phrase “Born Again” from a Catholic point of view.

Dr. John Bergsma — Young Adult Life

Dr. John Bergsma, biblical scholar and theologian at Franciscan University of Steubenville, shared his testimony at Franciscan University’s 2009 Defending the Faith Conference “Reasons for Hope.”  Dr. Bergsma speaks of his experience of God’s grace acting in his life to produce a true converso, a turning-around from Calvinism to the fullness of the faith in Catholicism.  “What I’m here to tell you about today is God grasping me and flipping me around,” said Bergsma, “to reveal a Catholicism that in a sense was always there, but I didn’t know it till it was revealed.”  In a journey that includes his father’s friendship with Cardinal John O’Connor, his parents’ openness to life, and encounters with the fidelity of Catholic priests, Dr. Bergsma gives a highly personal and remarkably powerful witness to the love of God and the grace mediated through God’s faithful servants.

PODCAST: Download a podcast of the full talk here.

Dr. Scott Hahn — Faith and Hope are Distinct

Dr. Scott Hahn, the Father Michael Scanlan, TOR, Chair of Biblical Theology and the New Evangelization at Franciscan University of Steubenville, spoke to Franciscan University of Steubenville’s 2010 Defending the Faith Conference “Be Transformed by the Renewal of Your Mind.”  In his talk, “Should Catholics Have Assurance of Salvation?”, he explains the distinction between the belief that “once saved, always saved,” and the Catholic belief that followers of Christ may have the “assurance of hope.”  “Despair is like an act of spiritual suicide,” explained Hahn.  “You are never beyond the saving reach of God’s all-powerful mercy.  His love and his capacity to save us is always greater than our capacity to sin, if only we turn and repent.”

Dr. Scott Hahn — Holding on to Hope

Dr. Scott Hahn, the Fr. Michael Scanlan Chair in Biblical Theology and the New Evangelization, spoke to Franciscan University of Steubenville’s 2010 Defending the Faith Conference “Be Transformed by the Renewal of Your Mind.” In his talk, “Should Catholics Have Assurance of Salvation?”, he explains the distinction between the belief that “once saved, always saved,” and the Catholic belief that followers of Christ may have the “assurance of hope.” “Despair is like an act of spiritual suicide,” explained Hahn. “You are never beyond the saving reach of God’s all-powerful mercy. His love and his capacity to save us is always greater than our capacity to sin, if only we turn and repent.”

Franciscan University Presents on EWTN