Dr. Michael Barber — Millennium: Unlocking the Book of Revelation

Dr. Michael Barber, Professor of Theology and Scripture at John Paul the Great Catholic University, gives a talk on the Book of Revelation at the Applied Biblical Studies Conference at Franciscan University of Steubenville in July 2010.

 

VIDEO: Watch a five-minute or a twenty-minute clip from this talk.

Dr. Alan Schreck — The Holy Spirit and Revelation

Dr. Alan Schreck, Professor of Theology at Franciscan University of Steubenville, speaks about “The Holy Spirit and Revelation” at the 2012 Defending the Faith Conference here on campus in Steubenville, Ohio.

Watch the whole talk here: Reflections on the Holy Spirit.

Dr. Michael Barber — Keys, Pits, and Binding: Old Testament Imagery in Revelation

A clip from “Millennium: Unlocking the Book of Revelation” by Dr. Michael Barber, Professor of Theology and Scripture at John Paul the Great Catholic University, given at the Applied Biblical Studies Conference at Franciscan University of Steubenville in July 2010.

PODCAST: Download a podcast of the full talk here.

Dr. Michael Barber — You Can’t Understand the End without the Beginning…

A clip from “Millennium: Unlocking the Book of Revelation” by Dr. Michael Barber, Professor of Theology and Scripture at John Paul the Great Catholic University, given at the Applied Biblical Studies Conference at Franciscan University of Steubenville in July 2010.

PODCAST: Download a podcast of the full talk here.

Informal Inference: Where Reason Meets Personhood

Dr. John Crosby, professor of philosophy at Franciscan University of Steubenville, delivered a lecture during the spring 2011 semester on “Newman on the Personal Exercise of Reason” at Franciscan University. It was the fourth in a series of five lectures by Dr. Crosby on “The Christian Personalism of Blessed John Henry Newman.”  In this lecture, Dr. Crosby discusses Newman’s distinction between formal and informal logic, between narrowly defined terms inserted into nearly mathematical syllogisms and encountering truth in the full organic complexity of thought and reality.

The Relationship Between Reason and Historical Facts

Dr. John Crosby, professor of philosophy at Franciscan University of Steubenville, delivered a lecture during the spring 2011 semester on “Newman on the Personal Exercise of Reason” at Franciscan University. It was the fourth in a series of five lectures by Dr. Crosby on “The Christian Personalism of Blessed John Henry Newman.”  In this lecture, Dr. Crosby discusses Newman’s distinction between formal and informal logic, between narrowly defined terms inserted into nearly mathematical syllogisms and encountering truth in the full organic complexity of thought and reality.

Personal Encounter with God

Dr. John Crosby, professor of philosophy at Franciscan University of Steubenville, delivered a lecture during the spring 2011 semester on “The Human Person as a World of His Own” at Franciscan University. It was the second in a series of five lectures by Dr. Crosby on “The Christian Personalism of Blessed John Henry Newman.”  In this lecture, Dr. Crosby discusses Newman’s understanding of the human person.  Citing a “really memorable expression of Newman’s,” Crosby says, “[The human person] has a depth within him unfathomable, an infinite abyss of existence, and the social scene in which he bears part is but for the moment, like a gleam of sunshine upon its surface…Newman proceeds to say that only in relation with God can all the affections of which we are capable awaken, even though this encounter with God is in the darkness of faith…if we only lived in relation to finite beings, we would never know how vast our heart is, nor suspect the infinite abyss of existence in it.”  We come to discover in ourselves a capax dei, a capacity for God, and so an infinity in our hearts.

The Human Person Before God

Dr. John Crosby, professor of philosophy at Franciscan University of Steubenville, delivered a lecture during the spring 2011 semester on “The Human Person as a World of His Own” at Franciscan University. It was the second in a series of five lectures by Dr. Crosby on “The Christian Personalism of Blessed John Henry Newman.”  In this lecture, Dr. Crosby discusses Newman’s understanding of the human person.  Citing a “really memorable expression of Newman’s,” Crosby says, “[The human person] has a depth within him unfathomable, an infinite abyss of existence, and the social scene in which he bears part is but for the moment, like a gleam of sunshine upon its surface…Newman proceeds to say that only in relation with God can all the affections of which we are capable awaken, even though this encounter with God is in the darkness of faith…if we only lived in relation to finite beings, we would never know how vast our heart is, nor suspect the infinite abyss of existence in it.”  We come to discover in ourselves a capax dei, a capacity for God, and so an infinity in our hearts.

It’s Personal: The Difference Between Notional and Real Apprehension

Dr. John Crosby, professor of philosophy at Franciscan University of Steubenville, delivered a lecture during the spring 2011 semester on “Personalist Spirit of Newman’s Thought” at Franciscan University. It was the first in a series of five lectures by Dr. Crosby on “The Christian Personalism of Blessed John Henry Newman.”  In this inaugural lecture, Dr. Crosby identifies the major markers of the personalist school of thought and situates Blessed Newman in the personalist philosophical tradition.  “[Newman] engages us personally by his special gift of awakening in us real apprehension,” said Dr. Crosby, a real apprehension which “touched to life” the truths of the faith in the minds and hearts of his hearers once again.

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